Thursday, February 25, 2016

Seiko Neo Sports Beige SRP713

Hidden deep in Seiko's product line up under its Conceptual Collection lies a range of Neo Sports watches powered by the ubiquitous hacking/handwinding 4R36. This line, which includes the SRP707, SRP709, SRP711, SRP713, and the SRP715, features a contemporary-sized 44mm diameter case (excluding crown) housing a dial with field/military design cues. Water resistance is rated at 100m.

This particular line seems to be a forum favorite but isn't that popular among non-Seiko fans or non-WISes. An Instagram search revealed only a handful of hits, and a lot of the hits pointed to the photos I myself uploaded. A shame really, because this line represents a lot of watch for the money, with a flexible aesthetic straddling the middle ground of being a tool watch and a dress watch. It can easily be dressed up or down depending on the wearer's whims, and it's available in a range of color combinations and strap options (black, blue, gray, beige dials, stainless steel bracelet or black/brown leather) and with a generic lug width of 22mm, the choices when it comes to straps are virtually limitless.

Features include a large, but not oversized, non-screwdown crown which is very easy to manipulate, hour hashes on the fixed coin-edged bezel, polished stainless steel surfaces except for the top of the lugs which are brushed, and a see-through exhibition caseback displaying a rather plain-looking, but reliable, 24-jewel, 21,600 bph, 41-hour power reserve, 4R36 movement. The dial comes in a variety of colors and is mostly a printed affair, with Arabic hour and 24-hour markers, lumed stick hour indices (the numerals themselves aren't lumed), and second hash marks. Dial text is relatively sparse, only highlighted by an applied Seiko logo midway between the center point of the dial and the 12 o'clock position, and a printed "Automatic" inscription in cursive font at the 6 o'clock end. Interestingly, the Seiko 5 logo is not at all present. Hands are lumed and of the fencepost variety, and the second hand features a lume ball on the opposite end. All of these details are topped off with a slightly domed Hardlex crystal.

As mentioned earlier, the case diameter is a rather large 44mm, and the lug width is a generous 22mm. Case thickness is 12mm, and lug-to-lug length is 50mm. The dimensions seem to be aimed at individuals interested in contemporary proportions, but may likely turn off those interested in watches with more classic sizes, or those with smaller wrists.

In the Philippines these models can be purchased for around 130-150 USD. In other territories, expect them to be priced somewhat higher, perhaps in the 200-300 USD range...still a bargain, considering what you're getting.

The specific model featured in this post is the SRP713, which has a beige dial, black markers, black outlined hands, red-tipped second hand, a black bordered day/date window, black text on white background day and date wheels, and a brown calf leather strap. Photos of the other models in this line will be shared in succeeding posts.

SRP713.







1 comment:

  1. A stunning watch I think personally , I have been looking for a watch with a vintage look but modernised , it looks very expensive I love the lettering and scroll work .I wanted this watch to wear as a reminder of my father and grandfather who both wore the same watch for years .This watch is now in my possession but is very old and ridiculously small by todays standards and on my wrist looks like a womens watch so I have been looking for something like this to wear as a reminder of them. Thank you for the review. It has been an interesting journey, I have purchased 3 watches along the way 2 are nothing like this one . I brought one for a weekend relaxing ,riding, yard work watch ,one for a work/dress diver and now I will purchase this watch. Along the way I have picked up an appreciation of watches and there meanings for different purposes other than telling the time . I love the Roman Numerals on this one and the Automatic curvasive writing . It harks back to me to the 1930's

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